Payment Card Malware Hits Retail Chains Across The US

Hackers have become more adept at creating methods to steal sensitive information that will yield a lucrative payday when sold on the dark web. Personal details fetch a considerable amount of money and are used to steal identities and access bank accounts. According to a cybersecurity research report, if a seller supplies full details about a card and its owner, it could yield between $30 and $45, depending on the region the buyer is from. Purchasers from the European Union will pay more for the information than U.S. buyers, for example.

The promise of quick monetary gain makes payment card malware that much more enticing for attackers. According to the “2016 Data Breach Investigations Report” by Verizon, 89 percent of data breaches had a financial motive. As payment card malware continues to hit retail chains across the U.S., it serves as a critical reminder for organizations to secure their systems and protect their customers.

Customer Data Exposed

Consumers are less likely to go to an organization that has been hit by malware or had personal data exposed. At the end of May 2017, fast-food chain Chipotle reported that nearly all of its 2,000 restaurants had been affected by a security breach. The malware was designed to access payment card data from point-of-sale devices, gathering information like card number, expiration date, verification code and cardholder name, Merced Sun Star reported. While the malware is now removed, new strains are developed quickly and could cause even more damage. The organization is working

Faronics Tech Roundup – May in Review

The second month of Q2, May was an eventful month, in terms of malware breaches. Let’s take a look at the news highlights from the month that was:

WannaCry Ransomware

Ransomware attacks can hit hard and fast, with organizations unaware of the issue until the damage is already done. WannaCry spread to businesses around the globe in mere hours on May 12, and by the afternoon, the infection was making national headlines. Companies and consumers alike panicked in the fallout of WannaCry’s ransom demands, wondering if their systems would be affected and how to prevent their hardware from getting breached. For the victims, the question was whether or not to pay to restore their data.

Earliest infection reports show that the first attack struck in Europe, where a computer user unknowingly opened a malicious email attachment, allowing WannaCry into their system. According to Financial Times, Spanish mobile operator Telefónica was among the first organizations to report a WannaCry infection. Shortly after, U.K. hospitals and clinics, French carmaker Renault, as well as some Russian and U.S. organizations announced they had been impacted. In total, at least 200,000 companies around the globe were attacked by WannaCry ransomware.

As time passed, solutions and patches to WannaCry have emerged to protect users, while those affected have taken action to recover. How could this strain have made as big of a splash as it has and what does it mean for the future?

OSX/Dok Malware targeting Mac users

Writers of this malicious code have typically

Unexpected Downtime: Understanding the Costs, and Controlling the Risks

Downtime is the major issue that keeps IT professionals up late at night. Employees must be able to reasonably access their critical business resources whenever and wherever necessary to improve productivity and deliver quality customer service. Whether you’re managing your own setup or are outsourcing infrastructure maintenance, upholding the service level agreement and meeting user expectations remain essential priorities.

Instances of downtime are occurring more frequently – problems with computer systems have recently grounded flights and generally hurt business relations. Just how dangerous is downtime really and how will it impact your organization? Let’s take a closer look at how companies are affected by downtime and how they tackle it.

Cost of Recovery Is Rising

Whenever a disruption happens in a business, every minute that goes by is a minute of lost revenue and sales opportunities. According to a 2016 report by the Ponemon Institute, the average cost of a data center outage now clocks in at more than $740,000, or $9,000 per minute, Data Center Dynamics reported. The expenses are even more severe for major organizations like Amazon, which controls a number of different sites, services and products and was impacted by a major outage in 2017.

Data center server room

Recovering from unexpected downtime is also a difficult feat for most businesses. When the power suddenly goes out or systems go offline, hardware can be negatively impacted, and data might be lost. That means that

OSX/Dok Malware Targeting Mac Users

More devices and operating systems than ever before have the potential to succumb to malware. Writers of this malicious code have typically aimed to exploit Windows vulnerabilities, but Mac users are no longer safe from an attacker’s sights. OSX/Dok malware was encountered toward the end of April 2017, and was discovered to be a rather sophisticated piece of work.

Recently, malware tactics have become much more polished and severe, getting around security measures and tricking users into becoming victims of the malicious virus. Mac users cannot stand idle against OSX/Dok and should be educated on this threat. Here are a few of the biggest things you need to know about OSX/Dok malware:

1. It’s Sent Through Emails

As with most malware and phishing campaigns, OSX/Dok is delivered through email attachments to unsuspecting receivers. According to Check Point, the research team that first encountered the malware, OSX/Dok mostly targeted European users, but it could become a global issue.

The threat came as a file named “Dokument.zip,” seemingly coming from a tax office. Once clicked, it would be decompressed to appear with the same icon as older versions of Apple’s Preview app, however, it would be oddly pixelated. These unusual characteristics should serve as red flags for any user when reading emails or looking at unfamiliar links.

Global email

2. OSX/Dok Takes Control of Your Systems

The OSX/Dok malware is particularly convincing because it puts up a fake update notification for

WannaCry Ransomware : Here’s What You Need To Know

Ransomware attacks can hit hard and fast, with organizations unaware of the issue until the damage is already done. WannaCry spread to businesses around the globe in mere hours on May 12, and by the afternoon, the infection was making national headlines. Companies and consumers alike panicked in the fallout of WannaCry’s ransom demands, wondering if their systems would be affected and how to prevent their hardware from getting breached. For the victims, the question was whether or not to pay to restore their data.

As time passed, solutions and patches to WannaCry have emerged to protect users, while those affected have taken action to recover. How could this strain have made as big of a splash as it has and what does it mean for the future? Here’s everything we know about WannaCry ransomware so far:

Europe Was Hit First

Earliest infection reports show that the first attack struck in Europe, where a computer user unknowingly opened a malicious email attachment, allowing WannaCry into their system. According to Financial Times, Spanish mobile operator Telefónica was among the first organizations to report a WannaCry infection. Shortly after, U.K. hospitals and clinics, French carmaker Renault, as well as some Russian and U.S. organizations announced they had been impacted. In total, at least 200,000 companies around the globe were attacked by WannaCry ransomware.

wannacry

It Was Developed With Leaked NSA Tactics

The U.S. National Security Agency has